Ye Olde Herren’s Restaurant

19 thoughts on “Ye Olde Herren’s Restaurant”

  1. I don’t know who all was on the distribution – I’m sure Lynn, Christy and Dave would love to see this. I left a brief comment. That was a lot of work man! I’ll be Balzer would love to have a copy of this as well (wonder if he’d pay?@%#$@%). Huge effort much appreciated.

    Like

  2. Wonderful!
    I remember Grandmother’s office upstairs with the peep hole looking down on the dining room.
    It would have been nice to have been remembered for the many years I worked there from 1970-1977 as hostess, cashier, bookkeeper, waitress supervisor and scheduler.

    Like

  3. Edna Neely, your “best” waitress was my beautiful red-headed aunt. She always spoke fondly of having worked for your family at Herren’s. In fact, when visiting her, she showed us the book written about the restaurant. She passed away in 2018 in Bartow, GA. after being widowed several years before. I have a beautiful daughter, reddish blonde hair, who thought Aunt Edna was her most gorgeous aunt! We all loved Edna very much.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you for this. We ate at Herren’s twice, around 1976 and 1980, when my husband’s cousin treated us to dinner. I was a California native and charmed by the whole experience. For many years I kept one of the bags that held your cinnamon rolls and used the recipe often. I did not know the history with the Civil Rights Movement, but I feel honored that I am able to remember your fine restaurant and learn that wonderful, admirable history. Thank you again.

    Like

    1. Thanks for your response to my blog. Herren’s was a very integral of my family history, from the time Guido bought it in 1938, until my dad, Ed Negri, auctioned all the contents in November of 1987. I worked there from as a manager, and VP of Operations from 1970 until I opened e.j.’s in Buckhead in 1975. Please tell me when Taylor passed. Which brother is your Dad, and which is your Uncle. Are they still with us? I have a picture somewhere of Taylor with all of the waitresses from about 1959. I’ll find it and send it to you.

      Like

      1. Hello Steve,
        Glad to receive your response. Taylor passed away in January of 2007. Tommy was my dad and sadly we lost him to cancer in 1997. Ted is still alive and lives in Illinois.
        I so enjoyed reading your post and thinking back to my Papa Taylor’s stories about Herren’s. As I’m sure you know, he was a pistol. I had a chuckle as I was reading between the lines at your mention of him. Hopefully he didn’t give you too much grief!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Loved rembering Herrens I worked nearby and had many “special ” lunches there. I`’ve been trying to remember the name of a Greek restaurant in the same area in the 1960s. Driving me crazy trying to remember the name. My boss went there every Friday for the Greek chicken. What is the name of that place???

    Like

    1. Hello June, Sorry it’s taken so long to get back to you. I have been remiss in visiting my blog, partly from a successful battle with Hodgkins Lymphoma that began about the time Covid hit in April. Happy to report I have been cured and am presently back at work, feeling 100%. To answer your question, I know of no Greek restaurants that were in service near Herren’s. There was Emile’s, French cuisine, behind us facing the Federal Courthouse. Leb’s up the street was a delicatessen. Ship A’hoy in the next block down from Herren’s was, like us, beef and seafood. There was a cafeteria, Evan’s I think, across from Ship A’hoy. Beyond that memory fails me. I was away in the US Navy from ’63 to ’67. Perhaps those were the years your Greek restaurant operated? Glad you enjoyed Herren’s! I often wish I could eat there again today, and regret taking it all for granted for many years. Lunch at Herren’s was special. When I worked there, ’70 to ’75, we would frequently serve well over 600 lunches in a day. Alas, there’s no more lunch at Herren’s.

      Like

  6. This bring back many memories for me. While working there along with Mr. Dunn, Ms Edna and Ms Blanch, and a host of others in the kitchen where I met my wife. And shortly after left and join the Army. This place was my footing that allowed me to go and grow. Sadly I lost my wife the salad girl, my salad girl. Now at 66 the photos brought back a flood of wonderful memories ( 72 – 76).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey Gary! I remember you well. I kept pushing to pay you more money, but the Army got you. That was our loss. You were one of my all time favorite employees. Where do you live now? I live near Charleston SC.

      Like

  7. I frequented Herren’s in the 1972-1974 period while I worked downtown at C&S Bank. It was a wonderful place to go get a really good meal if you had any appetite left after downing 2 or 3 baskets of the cinnamon rolls. I only learned of the acceptance of black patrons at Herren’s about 20 years ago. It was similar to the acceptance of black students at Trinity School in about the same time period. Allison Williams – pastor at Trinity Presbyterian – responded to the comment “But Pastor, if we accept a black student, 50 parents will pull their kids out.” by saying “Good. Then we can admit some of those 100 kids on our backlist.” They accepted and if any parents pulled their kids out, it was not noticeable. Based on the wait time times we encountered at Herren’s, I’m sure many regular patrons appreciated the shorter wait times if anyone boycotted Herren’s for doing the right thing in the 60’s.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your contribution, Bill. I was actively part of the Herren’s management team, along with Taylor Wise, from70 to 75 when I became the managing partner in our Buckhead restaurant, ej’s. I was away in the Navy when integration happened, but I was aware that there were some patrons who showed their dark sides during that period. Unfortunately, there was a noticeable decline in revenue as well. That was in 1963. By the early 70s we were back in the groove. Viva la Sweet Rolls. I wish I had a basket of them now.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s